New Street

New Street was made new around the end of the 19th Century. Before that it was a field track from Church Street to Nook Lane.

The 1884 O.S. map shows a path running from the Pinfold next to Hall Orchard School to Nook Lane (now Melton Road). At this stage there are six dwellings shown. The terrace - numbers 47, 49 and 51, a building opposite and a pair of single storey cottages where Ruby Walwork now lives.

Ruby’s mother always told her that her cottage was two so it appears that the neighbouring one was demolished some time between 1884 and 1921 to make room for the pair of houses which stand there now.

Most of the houses in New Street were built between 1890 and 1902. Cottages are named after General Gordon, Lord Beaconsfield and the Coronation of Edward VII.

Within living memory there was a plumbers’ merchant’s shop at the bottom of the street. An old lady sold fruit and vegetables from the outhouse at the side. She was succeeded by Alice Kimber, who married Frank Lockwood. The produce was grown on local allotments.

Stephen Joyce says that Mr Kimber once ran a fish and chip shop at number 48.

John Wilford’s yard was once home to a shoe factory which burnt down in the 1920s. The land now occupied by 16 to 22 New Street was owned by Barrow Land Society. The Society sold it to a Mr Holt who built four houses for rent in about 1936. On John’s deeds the site is called New Close. Evidence of a previous building is found in brickwork on one boundary which makes it difficult to erect fence posts.

John Nicols refers to “the pasture called New Close, containing 20 acres and also the pasture called Moglings, all within the parish of Barrow.” Is this the same New Close?

(John Wilford suggested that I contact Mrs Gladwell in Bryan Close about New St.)

Arthur Stark who occupied 37 New St. looked after the boiler at the Methodist Church in North St. He ensured that the building was warm for Sunday service by late night stoking.

F.J. Newham in Memories of Barrow upon Soar 1865 to 1875 writes that New Street was a ploughed field with a footroad to the Hall Orchard. The school children play in the school yard where there were once allotment gardens.

Some Interesting Houses In New Street

 A look at the stories of some of the houses in New Street

New Street was made new around the end of the 19th Century.  Before that it was a field track from Church Street to Nook Lane.

The 1884 O.S. map shows a path running from the Pinfold next to Hall Orchard School to Nook Lane (now Melton Road).   At this stage there are six dwellings shown.   The terrace - numbers 47, 49 and 51, a building opposite and a pair of single storey cottages where Ruby Walwork now lives.

Ruby’s mother always told her that her cottage was two so it appears that the neighbouring one was demolished some time between 1884 and 1921 to make room for the pair of houses which stand there now.

Most of the houses in New Street were built between 1890 and 1902.  Cottages are named after General Gordon, Lord Beaconsfield and the Coronation of Edward VII.

Within living memory there was a plumbers’ merchant’s shop at the bottom of the street.   An old lady sold fruit and vegetables from the outhouse at the side.   She was succeeded by Alice Kimber, who married Frank Lockwood.   The produce was grown on local allotments.

Stephen Joyce says that Mr Kimber once ran a fish and chip shop at number 48.

John Wilford’s yard was once home to a shoe factory which burnt down in the 1920s.   The land now occupied by 16 to 22 New Street was owned by Barrow Land Society.   The Society sold it to a Mr Holt who built four houses for rent in about 1936.   On John’s deeds the site is called New Close.   Evidence of a previous building is found in brickwork on one boundary which makes it difficult to erect fence posts.

John Nicols refers to “the pasture called New Close, containing 20 acres and also the pasture called Moglings, all within the parish of Barrow.”  Is this the same New Close?

(John Wilford suggested that I contact Mrs Gladwell in Bryan Close about New St.)

Arthur Stark who occupied 37 New St. looked after the boiler at the Methodist Church in North St.   He ensured that the building was warm for Sunday service by late night stoking.

F.J. Newham in Memories of Barrow upon Soar 1865 to 1875 writes that New Street was a ploughed field with a footroad to the Hall Orchard.   The school children play in the school yard where there were once allotment gardens. 


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Last Updated. 10-January-2016 By admin